israeli artist - judaica - A "Shiviti+hamsa " Amulet - protection against evil eye - Mid-Century Modern - gold gilt

Descripción
israeli artist - judaica - A "Shiviti+hamsa " Amulet - protection against evil eye - Mid-Century Modern - gold gilt
Israel - mid 20th century

A magnificent Jewish kabbalistic Amulet ( shiviti + hamsa) for protection against evil eye

Hand made in israel by an artist - circa 1950

Rich with Jewish motives - hamsa - Hebrew text

Lovey strong colors

Can be hang in the office or house


The hamsa (Arabic: خمسة‎ khamsah; Hebrew: חַמְסָה, also romanized khamsa; Berber languages: ⵜⴰⴼⵓⵙⵜ tafust) is a palm-shaped amulet popular throughout the Middle East and North Africa and commonly used in jewelry and wall hangings.[1][2] Depicting the open right hand, an image recognized and used as a sign of protection in many times throughout history, the hamsa is believed by some, predominantly Muslims and Jews, to provide defense against the evil eye. It has been theorized that its origins lie in Ancient Egypt or Carthage (modern-day Tunisia) and may have been associated with the Goddess Tanit.[3]

Khamsah is an Arabic word that means "five", but also "the five fingers of the hand".[4][5][6]

The Hamsa is also variously known as the Hand of Fatima after the daughter of the prophet Muhammad,[7] the Hand of Mary, the Hand of Miriam, and the Hand of the Goddess

Shiviti (שויתי in Hebrew, also: Shivisi, in the Ashkenazic pronunciation) are meditative representations of a candlestick used in some Jewish communities for contemplation over God's name. They are usually placed over the amud - the podium from which the prayer service is led by the hazzan. A decorated parochet or mizrach tapestry, or a special illustrated page in the siddur with similar imagery may also serve the same function.

The Shiviti displays the Divine Name of God (the Tetragrammaton) followed by a representation of the Temple seven-branched candlelabrum, or more accurately, lamp-stand (since oil rather than wax was used) as described in Exodus 25:31.

Shiviti is the first word in the Hebrew text of Psalms 16:8 meaning “I have placed” and the next word is the Tetragrammaton aforementioned, which is writ large. The complete verse means “I have placed the Lord always before me”, and is written at the top. This item is meant to enable the worshipper, while praying, to assume an appropriate posture and frame of mind, not unlike the Eastern mandala tradition.

The Kabbalists observed that Psalms 67 has a sentence structure such that it may be said to figuratively represent a lamp-stand.[citation needed] The first verse is the title, and it stretches across the entire stand, marking out the burning lamps. Of the actual text which follows, the fourth, middle verse is the longest, and represents the middle trunk and the long supporting shaft. The first and seventh are the next longest, and represent the long outer branches. The remaining inner branches are of equal word length.


Detalles del lote
Objeto
judaica - Un amuleto "Shiviti + hamsa" - protección contra el mal de ojo
Material
dorado dorado
Diseñador/artista
israeli artist
Estilo
Moderno de mediados de siglo
Periodo estimado
mediados del siglo XX
País de origen
Israel
Estado
Buen estado - usado y con pequeños signos de los años y con imperfecciones
Dimensiones
0.2×7.5×10 cm
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